How much does the average American weigh?

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Each body is unique. Make sure that you are at your ideal weight for your height.

The ideal waist circumference (WC) of women should be 31.5 (78.75 cm) for a women that is 5′ 3″ (157.5 cm) and for men 34.5 (80.25 cm)  at 5″ 9″  (172.5 cm), according to research.  The WC is moderately increased for women and for men based on height. Changes in medical research are moving from basing their studies on the average white male 5′ 10″ and 180 pounds (175 cm 81 kg) and taking into consideration family history and origin. Updated perimeters in how individuals are now measured and weighed, allow doctors and dietitians to better utilize standards, while considering the individuals physical frame and familial background. However, the question is what are the current averages and how are do Americans measure up to the ideal circumferences?

Another study was released from the National Center of Health Statistics on the average weight of an American Woman, at 164.7 pounds and for a man 190 pounds. Measured average height, weight, waist circumference and BMI for Adults ages 20 years and over with adults of 45-64 years old caring the bulk of the weight.

Increase of weight over the years compared to other countries comes from the influence and consumption of more calories in processed, junk and fast foods.  Additionally, the lack of movement or exercise are contributing factors to obesity on the rise, among all Americans, despite the gender or age of the individual.

Average American Adult Female:
Height : 5″4″ inches or 160 centimeters
Weight : 164.7 pounds or 74.70 Kilograms
Waist circumference: 36.5 inches or 91.25 centimeters
Body Mass Index (BMI 18-24 healthy): 28

The average male’s health statistics are as follows

Average American Adult Male:
Height (inches): 5′ 9″ or 173.25 centimeters
Weight (pounds): 191 pounds or 86.6 Kilograms
Waist circumference (inches): 39.0 inches or 97.5 centimeters
Body Mass Index (BMI 18-24 healthy): 28

Interestingly, the BMI for both men and women are the same.  Should the BMI be addressed?

  1.  Both DNA and Hormones play a role in how one gains or loses weight.  This is evident with the aging process and such diseases as hypo or hyper thyroidism.
  2. Additionally, a specific gene can now be determined and linked to obesity.  However, a two year dietary plan can be implemented to curve the palate and adapt a new way of meal preparation and daily intake for an individual.

    Body type depends on Ethnicity. Weight distribution is determined by dietary intake and amount of exercise

You should know that BMI is addressed in a Doctors or Dietitians office based on bone structure for diverse builds: petite, medium and large.

Determining weight for women has followed a set equation.

  1.  5′ = 100 pounds
  2.  for each inch over or under 5 feet is 5 pounds ( 5 in. x 5 =25 pounds)
  3. 15 pounds on either side of the final number is a health cushion and should not be exceeded or underachieved.
  4. 10 % is added or deleted for body type
  5. Large frame woman; 5’5″= 125 lb.’s + 12.5 lb.’s (10 % added for large)= 137.5 lb.’s +15 lb.’s (allotment) = 152.5 lbs
  6. Petite frame woman; 5’5″= 125 lb.’s 12.5 lb.’s (10 % reduced for petite)= 112.5 lb.’s +15 lb.’s (allotment) = 127.5 lbs

Body types are determined by Ethnicity Weight distribution depends on  dietary intake & amount of exercise

For a man the same rules would apply except the starting point is different

  1. 5’=106 pounds
  2. Each inch over 5 feet is 6 pounds ( 5 in. x 9 = 54 pounds)
  3. Each inch under 5 feet, reduce 5 lb’s (58″ 106 lb.’s – 10′ lb’s = 96 lb’s +15 lb’s (allotment) =111 lb’s)
  4. 15 pounds on either side of the final number is a health cushion and should not be exceeded or underachieved.
  5. 10 % is added or deleted for body type
  6. Large frame man; 5’9″= 160 lb.’s + 16 lb.’s (10 % added for large)= 176 lb.’s +15 lb.’s (allotment) = 191 lb.’s
  7. Petite frame man; 5’9″= 160 lb.’s – 16 lb.’s (10 % reduced for petite)= 160 lb.’s – 15 lb.’s (allotment) = 145 lbs
The height and weight for both men and women will be continually reviewed as the individual measurements are linked to nutritionally linked pathologys: Cardio Vascular Disease, Diabetes, Liver Disease and High Cholesterol to name a few.

Eat Know How’s objective is to provide the reader an understanding in “Knowing the Healing Power of Food”.  Making a few dietary changes by implementing EKH Recipes on a daily basis are packed with nutrients, tried and proven in EKH’s Cooking Classes.

Take time to browse articles on The Benefits of Lemon Water. Match up Recipes to Cholesterol and Triglyceride Reducing Foods. Lastly, learn how to modify salt in recipes by Using Herbs and Spices; Substitute the Salt Shaker

Check with your Doctor or Dietitian to confirm and advice on a plan to reduce food intake and advice on nutritional intake that is right for your. Read more on which Natural Appetite Suppressants to use, providing a feeling of fullness and nourishes your body.

MUST READ; FOODS TO REDUCE BLOATING & PROMOTE DIET

By Kim Crocker-Scardicchio

Literature Research
 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/bodymeas.htm
 http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/obesity/bmi_tbl.htm
 http://www.dietarysoftware.com/webmanual/1-bee.htm

Fast Food…Cure Liver Disease w Lifestyle Change

If you are asked to name two questions that are routinely raised at any Doctor’s office, most people would correctly respond:
  •  “Do you drink?
  •  “Do you smoke?” 
Even as changes are clearly noted by individual’s with present day increased prices in Health Insurance, how often are patients probed to reflect on a daily routine at a yearly check-up with a medical inquiry of, “How often do you eat fast food?”
 Recent research studies have proven that, A diet high in FAST FOOD consumption  leads to LIVER DISEASE (Cirrhosis, or Cancer)”.  “Fatty liver is the most common liver abnormality in children ages 2-9 years old,” revealed in The Office Journal of American Pediatrics October, 2006.  Liver disease can only be determined by having liver enzymes evaluated through a blood draw at a yearly check-up with ones Doctor.  The good news is that a Lifestyle Change in:  diet,  exercise,  avoidance of alcohollimited sodium intake, and Tea can return a damaged liver to a healthy state.    (Sadly, this is not always the case with liver cancer.)

Once diagnosed with liver disease, your goal is to help the organ return to it’s normal functions, it’s ability to process everything that you eat and drink. A healthy lifestyle can help you feel your best and help your body cope with it’s disease. By eating healthy and doing physical activity in moderation you will:
1. Give your body the energy it needs to work well.
2. Boost your immune system.
3. Help your liver renew itself.

Eat Well
Keep your energy level up by eating smaller meals and snacks more often.  Decrease some of the symptoms and the side effects of any treatments, such as feeling tired and sick by following a healthy diet.

  1. Chew on Fennel Seeds throughout the day (not to exceed 1 tsp!) to unclog the liver. Add Turmeric to your meals . It is become a well known spice in the medicinal world that whose powerful nutrients are known for healing organs.
  2. Carbohydrates(grains, fruits and vegetables)
  3. Fat Healthy oils such as: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola oil, Avocado and Smart Balance oils. Omega 3, 6 reduces the inflammation in the liver: Fish, Walnuts, Flaxseed
  4. Protein: Fish (3 x’s / wk), Poultry, Lean Meat
  5. Salt, canned and processed foods must be limited.
  6. Focus on lower saturated fat choices with each meal.
  7. Drink 6 to 8 glasses of fluids every day.

     

ENJOY THE HEALING POWER

1. Eat foods high in potassium to offset salt intake. Bananas, Kiwi, apricots, raisins, tomato puree, baked or roasted potatoes, veal and nuts, will all assist in ridding the body of excess sodium.
2. Enjoy light to moderate physical activity, such as walking, swimming, gardening

3.Build up slowly to 30 to 60 minutes of activity, at least 4 times a week.
4. Avoid food poisoning by storing and preparing foods safely. Wash your hands often.
5. Talk to your health care provider if depression affects your ability to eat well.

What your body does not need
1. Avoid alcohol.
2. Avoid foods that contain trans fat. Trans Fat must be 0 grams.
3. Reduce Sodium intake!  No more pretzels , chips, popcorn, french fries, cheese, certain meats, soy sauce and Avoid Sports Drinks.
                                 

Keep in communication with your doctor and dietitian so that neccessary adjustments can be made accordingly to your diet and physical activity plans.

By: K. Crocker

Literature Research

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/118/4/1388
http://organtransplant.mc.duke.edu/PDFs/Liver_Pre_3.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retr
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17006918&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17047295&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum
http://magazine.wustl.edu/Winter05/SamuelKlein.htm