Does Your Diet Lower Inflammation?

How can foods impact inflammation? Discover which foods work best for YOU!

Inflammation, (while part of a healthy immune response), is increasingly thought to play a leading role in encouraging a number of major killers, such as:   cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and Alzheimer’s. Dangerous chronic inflammation occurs when the immune system stays turned on and starts attacking healthy cells and tissues, or causing cancer genetic mutations, or the bursting of artery plaque.

What you eat, though, helps determine how much inflammation you produce. It is critical to realize the importance that Omega-3’s play in keeping at bay certain disease or in healing the body.  Doctor’s will also promote a diet rich in Omega-3’s after surgery or to reduce swelling after the body has undergone any type of trauma. Certain foods are inflammation-fighting and should be consumed in abundance (mainly plant or seafood) while other foods can promote and prolong inflammation (animal fats and white flour). Some recommendations:

GO FOR …

Omega-3 fats. These are among the BEST and most potent anti-inflammatory foods. Best sources: fatty fish like Salmon, Sardine, Anchovies and Tuna; Dark Leafy Greens: Broccoli, Kale, Chard, Spinach, Seaweed. Walnuts and other nuts; Flaxseed, Pumpkin Seeds; and Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Herbs and Spices: Basil, Oregano, Cloves, Marjoram, Tarrogan, SPearmint, Capers, Prepared Yellow Mustard, Peppermint, Thyme, Saffron, Bay Leaf, Chili Powder, Turmeric, Rosemary, Curry.

Colorful produce. Red Onions, Tomatoes, Prunes, Red Grapes, ALL Berries, Pomegranates, and Oranges all are packed with  flavonoids that have anti-inflammatory properties.

Herbs and spices. Ginger and Turmeric, Cinnamon either dried or fresh, are among the most healthful spices. For herbs, sprinkle on some freshly chopped Sage, Rosemary and minced Garlic.

Peanuts, Chocolate, Red wine. Red wine has anti-inflammatory chemicals like resveratrol. Dark chocolate,  at 70% or higher cacao which protects against inflammation. Great News for the research suggests that hot cocoa will also benefit the body’s health. Eat the peanuts right out of the shell in order to maximize reseveratrol intake.

REDUCE  …

Animal fats. Foods high in whole milk dairy are:  cheese, butter, margarine, ice cream.  Additionally:  egg yolks,  red meat, poultry skin,   All which contain high amounts of arachidonic acid, a molecule used by the body to create inflammation.

Omega-6 fats. While Omega 3 fats make a healthy impact on your body, it’s been found that Omega 6’s  trigger the body to produce pro-inflammatory chemicals. Oils rich in omega-6 fats include corn, safflower, and vegetable oils; mayonnaise; and many salad dressings.

Trans fats. Thanks to much research and the FDA getting behind the 8-Ball, trans-fats are all but gone from packaged foods as research shows they drive inflammation. Now they’re on nutrition labels, so they’re easier to avoid.

Rancid fats. CRITICAL to anyone who leaves the kitchen “to check on something” only to return and find that they have heated oil to the point that it’s smoking.  Besides the fact that smoking oil changes the flavor of a dish, it oxidizes fats and turns them into inflammation boosters. Also, avoid old peanut butter and any old chocolate stashed away for years in your pantry.

White starches. Flour, sugar, white rice, and instant mashed potatoes, for example, all cause quick spikes in blood sugar levels, causing the production of advanced glycation end products that spur inflammation.

Excess alcohol. Avoid drinking more than one or two alcoholic beverages a day; too much alcohol can cause changes in the intestinal lining, allowing bacteria to pass through into the bloodstream, triggering inflammation.

How to Wash Food to Prevent Lethal Outcome

While restaurants are facing criticism for how they handle lemons in drinks, I would dare say that food borne illness goes further than that.  Concerns should stem to how ALL UTENSILS and FOOD (including, fruit and vegetables) are being handled within every area of the restaurant.   It is not up to the customer to put the multiple controls put into place, but the Managers and employees themselves to ensure that the consumer does not return home with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or death.

Simple washing of food can be done with items that you have in your home right now, without purchasing a special “produce washing” product.  Cleansing of the fresh produce should not be limited to water, but instead can be done with the following. The best practice to put into place within your homes so that you keep yourself and family healthy and protected are:

Fruits and Vegetables with skins

  1. Use the same amount of soap that you would use for hand washing.  Completely wash the skin of fruit or vegetable with soap and water.  RInse thoroughly.
  2. In a large bowl, place desired produce to be cleaned, pour 1/2- 1 cup white vinegar over items into bowl.  turn food in vinegar to allow for thorough cleansing, about 10-20 seconds. Rinse with water.

Green Leaf Vegetables and Berries

  1. 1 Tbsp baking soda to 2-3 cups of water.  Stir. Allow shredded or whole lettuce, or whole berries to stay in solution for about 20-30 seconds. Rinse thoroughly.

Utensils should never be dipped in water to for cleaning.  ALL UTENSILS MUST ALWAYS be washed with hot soapy water to remove bacteria:

  1. Between cutting meats, fish and any other food.
  2. Before passing from one food to another food that contain nuts: Peanut Butter, Pesto, Ice Cream Cakes.  Cross contamination is lethal to those with food allergies and can result in death of individual.

This article is written to enforce the importance of HEALTHY EATING within homes and restaurants. Furthermore, individuals are having severe allergic reactions within restaurants and homes, due to improper cleansing of utensils between foods, especially those containing nuts and foods without nuts.

By: Kim Crocker

Poolside Silohouette? Flatten your Tummy, Choose your Foods

It’s that time of year which inspires us to get our bodies healthy for three months, so that we can sit poolside and look good.  Wouldn’t it be great if we could take our lessons learned from how to get a flat tummy now and maintain it over a life long period?  I’m not talking about being 104 pounds, but achieving our own healthy weight, so that we live a lifetime of being strong and focused, mentally intact and driven! Many respectable weightloss programs such as USANA’s Macro Optimizer, Reset also provides nutritional supplements so that you can achieve your goal effectively.

Many meals come from awesome summer foods that help to curve our appetite so that we are not tempted to indulge in ice cream and frozen Margarita’s.  The various delicious fruits and vegetables (veggies burn the most calories) will bring new flavors to your palette!  By eating 4-5 fruits and 5-6 vegetables a day, your body will have to make an effort to breakdown the food and that energy will contribute to weightloss!  Treat yourself to something new in your salad by shredding fresh herbs into your salad such as: cilantro, arugula, mint, parsley, 1 Small clove diced garlic, or basil which will become the driving force to try new summer recipes. 

A trick that adds diversity to your salads:  Choose 2 or more vegetables and one fruit dice them to bite size. Add 1/8 c. thinly sliced red onion, cheese of choice, herb of choice, 1 ounce of nuts, sprinkled flaxseed. Drizzle with vinaigrette dressing, or olive oil and balsamic vinegar. (salt and pepper to taste)

Fresh fruit drink.  Choose 2-3 fruits, wash and peel.  4 ounces of orange, pomegranate, cranberry or pear juice.  Place all in a mixer and liquefy.  May drink immediately, served chilled or frozen.

Please read the following clip from “Eight Summer Ultimate flat Belly foods” by David Zinczenko and Matt Goulding from Men’s Health who recently had an article posted on Yahoo

“Find a way to work these potent super-foods into your diet every day, and you’ll curb cravings before they hit, crowding out much of the junk we turn to when hunger calls. The result? Well, it could mean saving 600 calories or more a day. Couple that with 30 minutes of moderate exercise, and you can shed as many as 12 pounds in six weeks!  Which is in standing with the rule that states, “1-2 pounds a  week to properly shrink lipid cells” Read more on Calorie Shifting Fad and Facts and USANA Nutritional Supplements and Products  

1. Spinach
It may be green and leafy, but spinach is no nutritional wallflower. This noted muscle-builder is a rich source of plant-based omega-3s and folate, which help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and osteoporosis. Bonus: Folate also increases blood flow to the nether regions, helping to protect you against age-related sexual issues. Aim for 1 cup fresh spinach or a half cup cooked per day.

SUBSTITUTES: Kale, bok choy, romaine lettuce

FIT IT IN: Make your salads with baby spinach; add spinach to scrambled eggs; drape it over pizza; mix it with marinara sauce and then microwave for an instant dip.

2. Yogurt
Calcium is a major contributor to effective weight loss.  Various cultures claim yogurt as their own creation, but the 2,000-year-old food’s health benefits are not disputed: Fermentation spawns hundreds of millions of reinforcements for the battalions of beneficial bacteria in your body. That helps boost your immune system, provides protection against cancer, and even does duty as a cavity-fighter. Not all yogurts are created equal, though, so make sure the label says “live and active cultures.” And watch out for high-fructose corn syrup; stealth sugars are worth avoiding in yogurt and everywhere else.

SUBSTITUTES: Kefir, cottage cheese, ricotta

FIT IT IN: Yogurt topped with blueberries, walnuts, flaxseed, and honey is the ultimate breakfast — or dessert. Plain low-fat yogurt is also a perfect base for creamy salad dressings and dips.

3. Tomatoes
There are two things you need to know about tomatoes: Red are the best, because they’re packed with more of the antioxidant lycopene, and processed tomatoes are just as potent as fresh ones, because it’s easier for the body to absorb the lycopene. Studies show that a diet rich in lycopene can decrease your risk of bladder, lung, prostate, breast, skin, and stomach cancers, as well as reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Aim for 22 mg of lycopene a day, which is about eight red cherry tomatoes or a glass of tomato juice. Plant some now for a health harvest in July and August. This Men’s Health video will show you how.

SUBSTITUTES: Red watermelon, pink grapefruit, Japanese persimmon, papaya, guava

FIT IT IN: Dress sliced heirloom tomatoes with torn basil and olive oil; guzzle low-sodium V8 and gazpacho; roast cherry tomatoes and serve over grilled fish or chicken.

4. Carrots
Most red, yellow, or orange vegetables and fruits are spiked with carotenoids — fat-soluble compounds that are associated with a reduction in a wide range of cancers, as well as a reduced risk and severity of inflammatory conditions such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis — but none of them is as easy to prepare, or have as low a caloric density, as carrots do. Aim for a half cup a day.

SUBSTITUTES: Sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, yellow bell pepper, mango

FIT IT IN: Snack on baby carrots; grate raw carrots into salad; toss a carrot into a breakfast smoothie with frozen mango and OJ; roast carrot chunks with olive oil, salt and cumin.

5. Blueberries
Host to more antioxidants than any other North American fruit, blueberries help prevent cancer, diabetes, and age-related memory changes (hence the nickname “brain berry”). Studies show that blueberries, which are rich in fiber and vitamins A and C, also boost cardiovascular health. Aim for 1 cup fresh blueberries a day, or a half cup frozen or dried.

SUBSTITUTE: Açai, an Amazonian berry, has even more antioxidants than the blueberry. Mix 2 Tbsp. of açai powder into OJ or add 2 Tbsp of açai pulp to cereal, yogurt, or a smoothie.

FIT IT IN: Mix fresh blueberries into plain yogurt; blend with ice, yogurt, banana, and OJ for a 60-second smoothie; toss with baby spinach, red onions, goat cheese, and raspberry vinaigrette for a summer salad.

6. Black Beans
All beans are good for your heart, but none can boost your brain power like black beans. That’s because they’re full of anthocyanins, antioxidant compounds that have been shown to improve brain function. A daily half-cup serving provides 8 grams of protein and 7.5 grams of fiber, and is low in calories and free of saturated fat.

SUBSTITUTES: Peas, lentils, and pinto, kidney, fava, and lima beans

FIT IT IN: Wrap black beans in a breakfast burrito; use both black beans and kidney beans in your chili; puree 1 cup black beans with 2 Tbsp olive oil and roasted garlic for a healthy dip; add favas, limas, or peas to pasta dishes.

7. Walnuts
Richer in heart-healthy omega-3s than salmon, loaded with more anti-inflammatory polyphenols than red wine, and packing half as much muscle-building protein as chicken, the walnut just needs a cape and we could call it a superhero. Other nuts combine only one or two of these features, not all three. A serving of walnuts — about 1 ounce, or seven nuts — is good anytime, but especially as a post-workout recovery snack. Keep a can of Planters Nutrition Heart Healthy Mix in your desk drawer or glove compartment, and use them to lead you away from temptation.

SUBSTITUTES: Almonds, peanuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts

FIT IT IN: Sprinkle on top of salads; chop and add to pancake batter; mix 1 cup walnuts with a half cup dried blueberries and a quarter cup of dark chocolate chunks.

8. Oats
The original wunderkind of health food, oats garnered the FDA’s first seal of approval. They are packed with soluble fiber, which lowers the risk of heart disease. Yes, oats are loaded with carbs, but the release of those sugars is slowed by the fiber, and because oats also have 10 grams of protein per half-cup serving, they deliver steady muscle-friendly energy.

SUBSTITUTES: Quinoa, flaxseed, amaranth, pearly barley

FIT IT IN: Eat granolas and cereals that have a fiber content of at least 5 grams per serving; sprinkle 2 Tbsp ground flaxseed on cereals, salads, and yogurt; sub quinoa in for brown rice.”

Thank you to David and Matt for allowing Eat Know How to utilize a portion of their article!

By; Kim Crocker

List of Cholesterol and Triglyceride Reducing Foods

Must Read: Triglycerides, How They Are Influenced”  and Calculate Cholesterol, Choose TLC Menu Plan”  both articles provide a better over view of how to confront cholesterol and achieve reduced total cholesterol.

Choose your foods wisely to improve your daily nutritional intake, and cleanse your body, optimizing it’s overall function in keeping you healthy. Highlighted words will take you to healthy recipes.

Various foods, beverages and spices are known for reducing, or interfering with bad cholesterol (LDL) and carrying it out of the body.

  •  Fruits and Vegetables (totaling 9 per day)
  • Teas 2-4 cups a day
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil 2 -3 Tablespoons
  • Cinnamon:  1-4g (1/3 tsp – 1 1/2 tsp a day)
  • Ginger (250 mcg/day capsule form)
  • Honey 3 1/2 tablespoons / day

Maybe applied to any Meal Plan of choice.   Before doing your grocery shopping choose five foods from each catagory to buy and put in your refrigerator…………………

FRUITS choose 4 for daily consumption.

  • Apples, 1/2 cup
  • Apricots: Dried, cooked, unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Banana, raw 1 medium
  • Cantaloupe, raw About 1/2 cup diced
  • Grapefruit juice 3/4 cup. If taking statins avoid grapefruit.
  •  Honeydew, Cantaloupe & Watermelon 3/4 cup
  • Nectarine, raw 1 medium
  • Orange juice 6 ounces 
  • Peaches: Dried, Cooked, Unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Pears: Dried, uncooked 1/2 cup
  • Pomegranate,  1 medium
  • Prunes, dried, cooked, unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Prune juice, unsweetened 1/2 cup
  • Raisins 1/4 cup
  • VEGETABLES choose 5 for daily consumption. Click on for recipe.
  • Artichoke recipe,or Risotto with Artichokes globe (french), cooked 1 medium
  • Asparagus, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Beans: Green, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Avocado, 1/4 cup
  • Cauliflower  cooked 1/2 cup
  • Chard cooked 1/2 cup
  • Corn cooked 1/2 cup
  • Eggplant cooked 1/2 cup
  • Legumes cooked 1/2 cup
  • Mushrooms cooked 1/2 cup
  • Parsnips cooked 1/2 cup
  • Peas, green cooked 1/2 cup
  • Plantain  1 medium
  • Potato: Baked or boiled, with or w/o skin 1 medium
  • Pumpkin, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Rutabaga, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Spinach, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Squash, winter, cooked, mashed 1/2 cup
  • Sweet-potato: Baked 1 medium or Boiled 1 medium
  • Tomatoes: Raw 1 med., Stewed 1/2 c., Tomato juice, canned 3/4 c. 
  • Zucchini: saute` 1/2 cup

Red Meat, Pork and Poultry 3 ounces should be consumed in reduced amounts. If individual has  high Triglycerides Pork may be eliminated from the diet completely.

Laura’s Meat is a nice lean meat that will be beneficial to reducing LDL while obtaining protein. Purchase the 92% lean red meat.

  • Meat and Poultry Beef: lean only once day for a weight of 3 ounces
  • Ground Meat; extra lean, lean, or regular; baked or broiled 1 patty
  • Pot roast, braised, lean only 3 ounces
  • Roast, rib, roasted, lean only 3 ounces
  • Short-ribs, braised, lean only 3 ounces
  • Steak, lean only: Baked or broiled 3 ounces + Braised 3 ounces
  • Stew meat, simmered, lean only 3 ounces
  • Chicken, without skin: Breast, broiled or roasted 1/2 breast
  • Chicken Leg (thigh and drumstick), broiled or roasted 1 leg
  • Cornish hen, roasted, without skin 1/2 hen
  • Ham, roasted, lean only: Fresh, Smoked or cured 3 ounces
  • Lamb, lean only: Chop, shoulder; baked, braised, or broiled 1 chop Lamb Roast, leg or shoulder, roasted 3 ounces
  • Pork: Chop, baked or broiled, lean only 1 chop
  • Pork Cutlet, baked or broiled, lean only 1 cutlet
  • Pork Roast, roasted, lean only: Loin 3 ounces
  • Pork Shoulder 3 ounces
  • Turkey, light or dark meat, roasted, without skin 3 ounces
  • Veal, lean only: Chop, braised 1 chop Cutlet or steak, pan broiled 1 cutlet, Roast, leg, roasted 3 ounces

FISH 3 ounces. All Fish should be checked for dietary cholesterol;  most shellfish can be high in cholesterol and limited in consumption. 

  • Carp, catfish, flounder, or mullet; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Haddock, Mackerel, or Porgy; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Clams: Canned, Steamed, poached 3 ounces
  • Cod, Croaker, Pompano, or Trout; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Crabmeat, steamed 3 ounces
  • Lobster, steamed or boiled 3 ounces
  • Mussels, steamed, boiled, or poached 3 ounces
  • Ocean Perch, Pike; baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Oysters: Canned, undrained 3 ounces
  • Sea Bass, or Whiting; baked, boiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Salmon: Baked, broiledgilled, smoked 3 ounces
  • Scallops: Baked, broiled, grilled, steamed 3 ounces
  • Swordfish steak, baked, broiled, grilled 3 ounces
  • Tuna, canned, baked, seared, grilled 3 ounces

Legumes (Meat Alternate) 1 cup cooked is loaded with fiber and protein which will assist in eliminating LDL cholesterol.

  • Dry Beans, Peas, and Lentils Beans, cooked: Bayo, black, brown, or red kidney 1/2 c
  • Calico, chickpeas (garbanzo beans), mung, or pinto 1/2 cup
  • Fava, Lima, soybeans, or white 1/2 cup
  • Lentils, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Peas, split, green or yellow, cooked 1/2 cup
  • Soy milk 1 cup

MILK, CHEESE, AND YOGURT should be monitored carefully, or eliminated from the diet while reducing Triglyceride levels. 

  • Parmesean Cheese 1 oz
  • Milk 1% or skim
  • Chocolate skim milk 1 cup
  • Lowfat / non fat cheese 1 oz
  • Milk-based fruit drinks 1 c
  • Yogurt: Flavored, made with lowfat milk 6 ounces
  • Frozen Yogurt 6 ounces,
  • Frozen Fruit Yogurt made with lowfat or nonfat milk 6 ounces

Diverticulitis and Diverticulosis Diet Tips

 
Diverticula are small pouches in the wall of the digestive tract. They occur when the inner layer of the digestive tract bulges through weak spots in the outer layer. (This is similar to what happens when an inner tube bulges through a tire.) People who have these pouches are said to have diverticulosis. Sometimes one or more of these pouches becomes inflamed or infected, a condition called diverticulitis. Some people with diverticulosis become aware of the condition only when diverticulitis occurs.
Diverticulosis is a very common condition in the United States.
Diverticulosis is more common in developed or industrialized countries, such as the United States, England, and Australia, where the typical diet is low in fiber and high in highly processed carbohydrates, diverticulosis is common. Diverticulosis first appeared in the United States in about 1900. This was the same time that processed foods were first introduced into the US diet.
Diverticulosis is much less common in countries of Asia and Africa, where the typical diet is high in fiber. (For more information on diverticulitis, check with the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diverticulitis-diet/HQ00548)

Most people recover from diverticulitis without problems if they receive appropriate treatment. Diverticulosis and diverticulitis can be prevented by changes in lifestyle and habits.

Diverticulosis is thought to be caused by increased pressure on the intestinal wall from inside the intestine. As the body ages, the outer layer of the intestinal wall thickens. This causes the open space inside the intestine to narrow. Stool (feces) moves more slowly through the colon, increasing the pressure. Hard stools, such as those produced by a diet low in fiber or slower stool “transit time” through the colon, can further increase pressure. Frequent, repeated straining during bowel movements also increases pressure and contributes to formation of diverticula.
Diverticulosis in developed countries is blamed largely on the typical diet, which is low in fiber. For more information on Diverticulosis.

Diet Plan for Diverticulitis

  1. Grains
    enriched refined white bread, buns, bagels, english muffins
    plain cereals e.g. Cheerios, Cornflakes, Cream of Wheat, Rice Krispies, Special K
    arrowroot cookies, tea biscuits, soda crackers, plain melba toast
    white rice, refined pasta and noodles
    avoid whole grains as the seeds can get add to the inflammation within the intestine.
  2. Fruits:
    fruit juices except prune juice
    applesauce, apricots, banana (1/2), cantaloupe, canned fruit cocktail, grapes, honeydew melon, peaches, watermelon
    avoid raw and dried fruits, raisins and berries.
  3. Vegetables:
    Vegetable Juices
    Potatoes no skin
    beets, green/yellow beans, carrots, celery, cucumber, eggplant, lettuce, mushrooms, green/red peppers, potatoes (peeled), squash, zucchini
    avoid vegetables from the cruciferous family such as broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, Swiss chard etc
  4. Meat and Protein Choice:
    Well done, tender meat (lean), fish (wild caught) high in Omega 3 which will reduce inflammation within intestine. eggs
    Avoid beans & lentils
    Avoid all nuts and seeds, as well as foods that may contain seeds (such as yogurt)
  5. Dairy
    Two servings per day skim or 1% milk
  6. FATS
    Avoid saturated fats such as butter, margarine, Trans Fats, mealt high in fat content.
    MCT oil is most gentle on the intestine. You can also try plant oils. Extra Virgin Olive Oil, canola, avocado and peanut oils.

By: K. Crocker

Weightloss Tips

Curving Your Appetite when hunger hits and you don’t want to break your momentum and cave into temptation; focus on ways to keep your hands and mind busy:
  • Do your favorite hobby.
    Participate in sports.
    House Cleaning
    Play with your children
    Drink milk in place of water and have your water at meal times. Adults need an 8 oz glass of milk 2-3 times a day. It has more satiety than water and may hold you over until you next snack or meal.
    Exercise. Brisk Walk, Jogging, Yoga, Swimming.
    Talk with your support system: family or friends.
    Plan your daily meals for the next day.
    Eat your favorite fruit or vegetable. (Excellent fast food or on the go nutrition!)
    Review your goal chart and applaud yourself for the great job you’ve done.
    Eat a SMALL portion of your temptation.

What are Healthy Fats?
Healthy Fats and Oils(nothing solid at room temperature.)
EVOO (extra vergin olive oil),
Smart Balance omega 3-6, Canola, Avocado, Peanut oilfor
salad dressing: olive oil 1/4 cupbalsalmic vinegar 2 tbsp1/2 tsp oregano1 minced garlic clovepepper flakes

What about Salt?
Substitute Salt….Avoid salt, or reduce sodium. Instead spruce up meals with herbs and salt substitutes.
Watch out for Meats and Meat Substitutes. Include them in your daily sodium count. Sodium or saline water is often injected into meats for etended shelf life and meat preservation.
Prepared frozen foods.
Canned foods.

Other Good source of Protein
Eat Fish!! Fresh caught fish is higher in omega 3-6 fatty acids, because the fish can eat algae necessary for making the omega’s. This contributes to higher HDL intake. (also found in healthy oils and various nuts.)
Tofu
Nuts. Almonds and walnuts have the highest fiber at 6 grams /1 oz.

Fiber Intake (fat and sodium reducers!!!)
Fruits high in fiber are a great way to promote weightloss.
Avocado
Papaya
Guava
Cantaloupe
Orange
Apricots (dried, unsulfured)
Pear with skin
Apple with skin
Mango
Strawberries (organic)
KiwiGrapefruit (pink or red)
Tomato

Vegetables high in fiber are excellent calorie burners.
Baked Potatoes
Corn
Peas
Broccoli
Carrots
Brussel Sprouts
All Legumes
Portabella Mushroom
Breads and Cereals High in Fiber
Aunt Millies multi-grain breads
Bran
Flaxseed

About Nuts
Even healthy fats need to be monitored in the right amounts.
Enjoy them in small amounts, 1 oz per day 4 x’s/ wk. They also contain great fiber and are high in Mono/Poly unsaturated fats. Hickory, cashews, black walnuts, filbrets, macadamia, peanuts, pecan, pine nuts, pistachio.

DRINK Lemon Water.  It is a natural laxative used to rid your body of toxins.


http://www.gicare.com/pated/edtgs01.htm

By: Kimberly Crocker