Euphoria, Pleasure, Happiness! Which Nutrient do You Need?

Need a pick me up? Do you feel deflated, demotivated, or depressed? Such pessimistic symptoms can leave one dragging their feet, however, can also be combatted through an intake of dietary nutrients that provide a natural supplementation for enhancement of moods

Foods that Increase Euphoria & Pleasure Release Dopamine

A good reason to consume 1 ounce of dark chocolate a day is that it has the chemical phenylethylamine which releases dopamine.  Dr. Mindy Dopler Nelson of Stanford University,  states that, “The compound is thought to be  responsible for the high you experience after eating chocolate because it releases natural feel-good chemicals called endorphins in your brain.  According to All Chocolate, PEA is released by the brain when people are falling in love, and this might explain why chocolate and Valentines Day are so closely linked.”

Chocolate has a chemical that causes dopamine to be released in the brain, inspiring a sense of euphoria and pleasure.

Dr. Nelson explains, “Chocolate is a stimulant that will release the dopamine that creates that pleasure feeling. It’s in the cocoa. There’s more of it in dark chocolate than in milk chocolate. But there’s something about the fat in the milk that also will make you feel good. Some people associate a comfort food with a high-fat food. There also are antioxidants in the dark chocolate, but watch the dosage! Excess can be harmful for your liver and pile on the pounds. Dopamine has an amphedamine effect, hence the term chocoholic. You also cannot ignore the fact it contains mucho caffeine that will keep you up at night. (And if you don’t get enough sleep it will effect your serotonin level.)

Other food sources of phenylethylamine are: Almonds (can promote migraine headaches if too many are consumed.) and Cheese should be consumed in 1 ounce or 28 grams per day, Red Wine (4-6 ounces or 125-200 ml per day) and Tomatoes.  An apple a day contains tyrosine which also converts to dopamine.

Eat to Improve Mood, Memory, & Sleep: vitamin B6 & Trytophan

If diagnosed with depression, try pursuing some dietary changes before starting medication, or implement in addition to the intake of medication.  Facing depression head on, incorporating walking twice a day along with new nutritional choices and professional help can give you a new perspective on life.  Your daily dietary intake should consist of 2-3 of the following through out the day:

  • Nuts (1 ounce, or 28 grams a day) Cashews or Brazilian Nuts are also linked to reducing coronary, depression, and diabetic symptoms in addition to promoting weight loss.
  • Bananas (1 banana per day)
  • Poultry for protein (tryptophan. 4-6 ounces)
  • Salmon
  • Tofu
  • Milk  (8-16 ounces or 245-490 ml per day)
  • Yogurt (4-6 ounces a day or 125-200 ml day)
  • A plate of Sri Lanken Chicken Cashew has nutrition properties to reduce symptoms of depression.

Cashew nuts are very rich source of minerals. Minerals especially manganese, potassium, copper, iron, magnesium, zinc and selenium are concentrated in the nuts. A handful of cashew nuts a day in the diet would provide enough of these minerals and prevent deficiency diseases.

 “Vitamin B6 and Tryptophan”.   Foods such as turkey, chicken, quail, banana, and even milk can fight depression symptoms. All contain Vitamin B6 (which helps create serotonin) and have the protein Tryptophan  that can be converted to the neurotransmitter, serotonin, which is linked with happiness, or known as a “Mood” enhancer.  In simplified terms, a Neurotransmitter (serotonin for example), is like the super-autostrada of information in your brain that allows different parts to talk to each other!!!

Tryptophan can be found in a variety of foods to help fight depression, they include: chocolate, bananas, poultry, meat, whole grain pasta, fennel seeds, figs, fish, peanuts, milk and cottage cheese.  A list that many can pick and choose from and find health and comfort.                                                         

Artificial sweeteners are often found in beverages and processed foods; such sweeteners depress pleasure hormones dopamine and interfere with the production of serotonin.

Foods to AVOID.  Any foods or drinks (Diet) with artificial sweetners should be avoided.  Multiple studies have shown this aritficial sweetner to depress serotonin levels. Those with a history of mood disorders or depression have been linked to a severe reaction after consuming aspartamine. Additional weight gain is attributed to aritificial sweetners, as they interfere with an individual’s “internal calorie counter” causing the hormones ghrelin (go eat) and leptin (stop eating) to malfunction. While consuming a diet drink with a meal of 700 calories, the leptin hormone does not respond to the feeling of satiety because the internal calorie counter thinks that only 300 calories have been eaten; that kind of deficit adds up to weight gain and to depression.

Stay on the medication.  Do talk to your doctor about how you can work with them in pursuing necessary dietary changes that will nutritionally benefit you as well.

Nutritional Facts:  Include foods in your diet with B Vitamins. They contain two amino acids: Phenylalanine and Tyrosine, which are precursors to noraepinepherine and tryptophan, which are precursors to the neurotransmitter, serotonin.

Other vitamins which may contribute to mood enhancers are: zinc, selenium, calcium, Vitamin D, iron and magnesium.

By: Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio

Literature Research

Health Benefits of Lemon Water

Relieving digestive problems can be done through food and beverages that you may already have in your own kitchen.

Squeeze juice from 1 lemon into a glass of water.

Constipation, upset stomach gas pains, kidney stones and edema? Can all be uncomfortable and difficult to overcome. A solution that works and practiced in many countries is Drinking Lemon Water.

There is a natural way to soothe body pain,or reduce flatulence and relieve constipation, providing your body with the necessary fluid intake, Vitamin C  and potassium to flush out excess sodium, keeping your organs (i.e. heart, kidneys ) and muscles healthy and the electrolytes in balance. 

 

Malic Acid, a common ingredient used in over the counter “upset stomach” medication, is a “Naturally occuring Organic element” within lemons.  The alkaline malic acid is introduced to the stomach working with the pH balance and then into the intestinal tract, reducing the negative effects of enzymes that contribute to gas and bacteria. 

The SECRET HEALTH HINT comes from one of the many benefits of a lemon.  A simple recipe will provide immediate results:

1.  Squeeze the juice of 1/2 a lemon into a glass of water. Do this once or twice a day if you are under 150 pounds/83 kilo’s, once in the morning and once at night.

2.  Over 150 pounds/ 83 kilo’s, squeeze the juice of 1 whole lemon in a glass of warm water, twice a day.

Fiber  and exercise will also “get things moving” and should be a regular part of ones daily dietary intake.  

Food and beverages that may assist in synthesizing bile salts and secreting bile acids, returning you to comfort are: berries, watermelon, celery, spinach, dandelion, artichokes, fennel or dandelion tea and spices like fennel seeds, turmeric, or red pepper flakes. (see quantities below.) All credited to contributing to the success of a healthy body. (Suffer from IBS?  Include these foods & beverages in your daily intake.) 

Lastly, keep your muscles toned by scheduling a walk 20 minutes per day to improve your overall digestion and stay in a regular way! 

 

By Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio

Include the following foods into your daily routine to relieve stomach discomfort and promote regular bowel movements.

 

1/3 cup berries of choice

1/2 cup watermelon

1-2 stalks celery

1 cup spinach salad

1/3 cup sauteed dandelion greens

1/4 cup artichokes

1/3 cup sliced fennel

12-18 fennel seeds can be chewed on per day

1/4 tsp turmeric added to potatoes, rice or pasta

1/8 tsp of pepper flakes to soups and vegetables

Drink plenty of water and tea! 2-4 cups of fennel or dandelion tea a day will also relieve discomfort of the stomach.

More nutrtion articles to read:

Fast Relief: Fennel Seeds Combat Gas and Upset Stomach  and  Turmeric to Ease Acid Reflex

References

http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/benefit_of_drinking_green_tea

Nephron Protectively due to effects of Vitamin C

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23009987

Anti-bacteria activity reversed by Vitamin C and E

Mussels in Creamy Wine Sauce

Mussels enjoyed in a white wine sauce will leaving your guests wanting for more!

Italians enjoy seafood!  This plate full of mussels can be served with or without cream. Mussels can be prepared as an appetizer or as an entrée with pasta. Enjoy the sauce and dip into it with grilled italian bread or ciabatta.  Recommended wine is a Pinot Grigio. Use the wine finder to choose a wine at the following link,  wine

Serves 6 people

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Onion minced
  • 1/4 cup Olive Oil
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 4 Cherry Tomatoes
  • 2 pound Mussels
  • 1 cup Pinot Grigio white wine. (optional)
  • 1 cup Heavy Whipping Cream
  • 1 Garlic Clove ( minced and set aside)
  • 2 Tbsp Parsley ( chopped and set aside)
  • Pepper to taste (cracked black pepper of red pepper flakes)

Directions

Place oil, onion and salt into a large skillet and allow to sauté  over medium heat for 4-5 minutes until the onion is translucent. Add tomatoes, allow to cook for 4 minutes. Meanwhile, place clams and mussels in a colander, wash and scrub shells with cold water and place into skillet. (Only for fresh mussels.)  Frozen mussels have been pre-washed and can be added directly into the heated skillet. Add wine and cream to mussels , stir for 30 seconds. Add garlic. parsley and pepper allow to simmer for 5 minutes.

Can be served over pasta or with toasted Italian bread.

Second large pan: Healt 1/2 cup Olive oil on Medium heat with two garlic cloves for 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Butternut Squash Soup

Butternut squash is a perfect winter dish!

Butternut squash is a perfect winter dish!

Pick it up! It’s not that hard to work with and one bowl of soup will leave you asking for, “More Please!” Butternut Squash is an ideal winter food, although, by exchanging herbs can bring out a spring flavors as well.  Butternut squash is loaded with Vitamin A & C, Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorous, Potassium.

Serves 6
Preparation time 30 minutes. Can be made up to 2 days in advance.

Saute` vegetables for 20 minutes.

Saute` vegetables for 20 minutes.

INGREDIENTS
1 /4 cup olive oil
1 celery (quartered)
1 carrot (quartered
1 onion (sliced)
1 butternut squash peeled and cubed
1 potato peeled, quartered & boiled.
2 teaspoon salt
1 cup milk
1 Tbsp  Rosemary OR Cilantro to taste

DSC01403

Slicing squash is simple. Loaded with vitamins & minerals, it's the perfect winter food.

Slicing squash is simple. Loaded with vitamins & minerals, it’s the perfect winter food.

DIRECTIONS
In large sauce pan, add olive oil, celery, carrot onion and butternut squash (peeled, seeds scooped out and cubed.) On medium heat allow to saute` for 20 minutes, stirring periodically. In a seperate pan, boil potatoes until fork tender. Drain potatoes and place into pan with saute` vegetables.  Remove from heat. add milk. Puree vegetables with method of choice, i.e. hand blender. Return pan to low-heat and allow to warm for 5 minutes. Serve into bowls, top with chopped herb of choice.

Panellets! Almond Cookies

ImageAlmond cookies made with fresh lemon are easy to make and substantially nutritious.  Tradition wants these cookies to be made on All Saints Day November 1 in Spain.  A great dessert that can be paired with: espresso, coffee, lemon tea, Vin Santo or Limoncello. Almonds are high in Vitamin E, Manganese, Magnesium and Potassium; all which promote heart health. It has also been demonstrated, that a handful of Almonds consumed together with white bread or sugar shows a drop in the Glycemic Index, stabilizing the blood glucose after meals.

  • 1 pound (500 g) of Almond Meal/Flour
  • 2 1/2 cup (350 g) granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup (100 ml) water
  • 1 small potato (200 g)
  • 1 grated lemon peel (no white pith)
  • 5 drops of lemon juice

TOPPINGS: choose your favorite! Make a variety of flavors to accent your dessert table.

  • 1 Egg beaten
  • 1 cup (57 g) Pine Nuts
  • 1 cup (57 g) Crushed Almonds
  • 1/3 cup Cocoa Powder with 2 Tablespoons Instant Coffee or Espresso Powder
  • 1/2 cup (28 g) Coconut Flakes
  • Masharano Cherries

Peel the potato and cut into quarters. On high heat, boil potato in a small saucepan of water until cooked, easily breaks apart, 15 minutes cook time. Drain water and mash potato with a fork. Set aside.

In a second medium sized saucepan, place sugar and water. Over medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon until sugar is dissolved; about 8 minutes, add lemon juice. Turn off heat and remove pan, the liquid should become clear syrup).

Add to syrup: the Almond Flour, Mashed Potato and Lemon Peel. Stir vigorously until all ingredients are combined to a dough. Remove dough and roll dough into a log with a diameter of 1 1/2 inch (3 cm). Place onto plastic wrap, completely wrap and place in refrigerator for 1/2 hour.

Pre-heat oven to 450 F.

Meanwhile, prepare toppings, placing each one into individual bowls/plates.

Grease cookie sheet with butter.

Remove dough from refrigerator, discard plastic wrap and put dough onto cutting board. With a teaspoon cut a piece of dough and make into a small ball. Place ball into favorite topping roll it around and then onto cookie sheet. IF USING NUTS AS A TOPPING, brush dough ball with egg,  then roll dough into nuts and place onto cookie sheet.  Place into oven on center rack and allow to bake for 8 minutes until golden in color. Remove cookie sheet from oven and allow cookies to cool for about minutes, place onto plate cover and store in the refrigerator. Served cold.

Kidney Disease Low Phosphorus Diet

We are all provided with two equal fist sized organs, found in our lower back on either side of the spine just above the waist called Kidneys. Renal physiology is the study of kidney function, while nephrology is a medical specialty that focuses on kidney disease.

In brief, the kidneys perform multiple functions to sustain the life of the body, cleanse the body by removing waste and excess fluid through urine, provide a balance of water, salt, potassium, phosphorus and produce an active form of Vitamin D.  Multiple hormones and enzymes are produced in the kidneys and released into the body affecting the function of other organs, signaling red blood cell production, regulating blood pressure (Renin) and calcium metabolism.

The degradation of the kidneys can be influenced by a variety of factors. Having regular check-ups is key to kidney health. Do not miss doctor appointments if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic urinary tract infection, bladder issues, chronic lower back pain. Any of all of these factors should be monitored an communicated in a timely manner.

   When kidneys begin to function improperly an individual may have any, or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue and weakness, loss of energy, sleep problems, any change in output or color of urine, decreased mental awareness, muscle twitches or cramps, hiccups, swelling of feet or ankles, persistent itching, chest pains, shortness of breath, high blood pressure. Symptoms should be discussed with your Doctor. Early detection of kidney disease can be addressed, so that the health of the kidneys can be sustained.

A diet low in phosphorus, sodium and balanced protein is critical when addressing kidney disease. Listed below are foods allowed for patients facing kidney issues taken from DaVita who specializes in Renal Disease.  Four important points should be reviewed with your Doctor or Dietitian.

  • Foods Low in Phosphorus (less than 110 mg per serving)
  • Consume 800-1000 mg of phosphorous per day.
  • Portion Size is critical to staying in range of low phosphorus.
  • (A normal phosphorus blood level is 3.5 to 5.5 mg/dL)
Additional information on the kidneys can be reviewed at The National Kidney Foundation. Learn more about Renal Health, disease and locate professionals that can answer your questions.
By: Kimberly Crocker-Scardicchio
References
The National Kidney Foundation http://www.kidney.org/index.cfm
DaVita http://www.davita.com/
Webmd http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-kidney-disease-basic-information
Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/kidney-failure/DS00682

LOW PHOSPHORUS FOOD SERVINGS & mg/100g

Low-phosphorus meat and poultry choices
Fresh or frozen red meats without additives or enhancements are better choices (be sure to check ingredient labels; even fresh chicken and pork may be injected with phosphates and sodium) for a kidney diet.

** Choose meats without breading, marinades or sauce. On average, fresh meat contains 65 mg of phosphorus per ounce and 7 grams of protein per ounce. Check with your Doctor or Dietitian on serving size per meat. While most will say that 3 ounces is fine the following serving size has been modified to a 2 ounce serving size.

Phosphorus content for a 2-ounce portion, cooked:

Beef, pot roast: 104 mg Beef, sirloin steak: 126 mg
Chicken breast, skinless: 126  mg Chicken thigh, skinless: 100 mg
Hamburger patty 90% lean ground beef: 114 mg Lamb chop: 122 mg
Pork roast: 126 mg
Turkey breast meat, skinless: 122 mg Turkey thigh meat, skinless: 114 mg

 Low-phosphorus fish choices 

Fish is a high-quality protein that contains omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty saltwater fish such as salmon and tuna are highest in omega-3, reducing inflammation and protecting against heart disease and cancer.

Phosphorus content for a 2-ounce portion, cooked:

Mahi Mahi: 104 mg
Tuna, canned: 88 mg

 

Low-phosphorus seafood choices

Seafood is an excellent source of very low-fat, high-quality protein. However, there are differences in varieties of the same species. For example, Pacific oysters contain 50 mg more phosphorus in a 3-ounce serving compared to Eastern oysters.

Phosphorus content for a 3-ounce portion, cooked:

Shrimp: 120 mg
Oysters, Eastern: 120 mg
Snow crab: 120 mg

 Low-phosphorus breads

Bread is a good source of carbohydrates and calories needed by your body fo renergy production. While whole grain bread is a healthy source of fiber, it also has more phosphorus and potassium than white flour bread.

Phosphorus content for a 1-ounce portion, (usually one piece of bread):

Bagel, cinnamon raisin, blueberry, plain, onion, 1 ounce: 53-70 mg Corn tortilla, 6-inch: 75 mg
English muffin, 1 ounce: 52-76 mg Flat bread: 48 mg
Flour tortillas, made without baking powder: 20-37 mg French bread or rolls: 28 mg
Italian bread or rolls: 29 mg Light wheat bread: 38 mg
Pita bread, white: 58 mg Sourdough bread: 30 mg
White bread: 25 mg

 Low-phosphorus pasta and rice

Pasta, rice and other grains are a great source of carbohydrates, calories and B vitamins, plus zinc, copper and iron. For a kidney diet, whole grains like brown rice, oat bran and wild rice ARE LIMITED due to the higher phosphorus content. A half cup of brown rice has 75-81 mg of phosphorus which can add up if you eat a larger portion.

Phosphorus content for a 1/2 cup portion, cooked:

Couscous: 20 mg Egg noodles: 50-60 mg
Macaroni: 40 mg Pearled barley: 43 mg
Plain white rice, short, medium or long grain: 35 mg Rice noodles: 14-28 mg
Spaghetti: 42 mg

 Low-phosphorus dairy, dairy substitutes and egg whites

Milk and milk products are high in calcium and phosphorus, so finding an acceptable lower phosphorus substitute is a must. A half cup of milk (4 ounces) contains 111-138 mg of phosphorus. Some liquid dairy substitutes can be used in cooking to replace milk, but not all products are interchangeable. Read ingredient lists to look for phosphate additives in nondairy products. Some products are fortified with calcium-phosphate. Beware of the ones that promote “high in calcium” as these are also high in phosphorus. Eggs are a great protein source but also contain 95 mg phosphorus in a large egg. Remove the yolk and phosphorus is only 5 mg for each egg white.

Phosphorus content for a 1/2 cup portion, unless stated otherwise:

Almond milk, Almond Breeze®, original: 50 mg Nondairy creamer without phosphate additives: 40-53 mg
Nondairy whipped topping, 2 tablespoons: 0-10 mg Sherbet: 38 mg
Sour cream, 2 tablespoons: 20-40 mg Soy milk varies by brand: 50-125 mg
Unenriched rice milk without calcium-phosphate additives: 29 mg Egg whites, pasteurized 15 mg

 Low-phosphorus snacks

Crackers, cookies, candy, fruits or vegetables — all are appealing snack foods.There are many low-phosphorus choices for your kidney diet.

Apple, 1 medium: 10 mg Applesauce, 1/2 cup: 6 mg
Baby carrots, 9 pieces: 25 mg Biscotti, without chocolate or nuts, 1 ounce: 35-50 mg
Blueberries, 1/2 cup: 9 mg Celery, 1 stalk: 10 mg
Cherries, 1/2 cup: 15 mg Fig bars, 2 bars: 10-25 mg
Fruit candies, hard candy, chews or gummy: 0 mg Fruit cocktail, 1/2 cup: 17 mg
Gelatin, without phosphate additives: 20-30 mg Low sodium crackers, 1 ounce: 20-35 mg
Peach, 1 medium: 10 mg Lemon Juice, 3 fluid ounces: 3.6 mg
Pineapple, fresh, 1/2 cup: 6 mg Radishes, 10: 9 mg
Shortbread cookies, 4 cookies: 17-35 mg Sorbet, 1/2 cup: 2-6 mg
Strawberries, fresh, 1/2 cup: 18 mg Unsalted popcorn, 1 cup: 8 mg
Unsalted pretzels, 1 ounce: 20-40 mg Vanilla wafers, 1 ounce = 5-8 cookies: 12-20 mg

 Lower phosphorus cheese choices

All cheese contains phosphorus with most having 120-250 mg per ounce; some contain more than 300 mg per ounce. The suggested portion for a dialysis diet is usually one ounce of cheese 1-2 times a week if phosphorus is controlled. Check with your dietitian for individual recommendations. Cream cheese-based spreads are much lower in phosphorus than cheese-based spreads. Portion control is key when it comes to cheese!

Low-phosphorus cheese choices:

Blue cheese, 1 ounce: 110 mg Cottage cheese, 1/4 cup: 92 mg
Cream cheese, 2 tablespoons: 20-40 mg Feta cheese, 1 ounce: 96 mg
Neufchatel cheese, 1 ounce: 39 mg Parmesan cheese, grated, 2 tablespoons: 72 mg

 Managing a low-phosphorus diet

Avoid dried fruits which are higher in phosphorus levels including: raisins, prunes, peaches, pears, dates, currants, bananas. Legumes should be reviewed with your dietitian, some are higher in phosphorus and may not be allowed.

FRUITS

Most fruits can be factored at 10 mg phosphorus per serving. Some fruits do not have any phosphorus. Fresh fruits with higher levels of phosphorus can be eaten in moderation. Weigh your food carefully to configure the amount of mg/100g.

GREAT CHOICE, No present phosphorous in fruit; Raspberries, Cherries, Grapefruit, Lychee, Apricots, Pineapple, Plum, Pumpkin

Banana 27 mg; Blackberries 27 mg; Kiwi 71 mg; strawberries 27mg; Tomato 63 mg; Watermelon 26 mg; Mango 23 mg; Orange 18 mg

VEGETABLES

GREAT CHOICE, No present phosphorus in vegetables: Brussel Sprouts, Chicory, Cucumber, Pickles, Leeks, Olives, Radish, Red Paprika,

Asparagus 49 mg: Artichoke 103 mg; Avocado 82 mg; Broccoli 46 mg; Baked Beans 132 mg; Cabbage 36 mg; Carrots 23 mg; Cauliflower 20 mg; Corn 79 mg; Green Beans 26 mg;  Green Peppers 14 mg; Mushrooms 36 mg; Onion 23 mg; Peas 187 mg; Potato 78 mg; Spinach 15 mg; Zucchini 7 mg; Lima Beans 178 mg;

If baking at home, explore substitutes in baking found at DeVita.com. Bakers Active Dry Yeast provides a good solution when baking.  Another TIP to adding levitation is to follow the recipe backwards, eliminate baking powder and salt. Beat the egg whites in a separate bowl until foamy, add a few grains of cream of tarter, beat another 10 seconds. Lastly, fold egg whites into the other ingredients.

Read Your Palm, Determine Your Diet

Open hand, read your palm to know your serving size of meat.

Read your own palm and know your personal dietary needs. An open flat palm (don’t include the fingers) shows the size of meat, poultry or fish that YOU should consume. The thickness and the length of the palm perfectly identifies your personal protein needs. While an individual’s fist size (closed hand) can give you your own serving size for fruit and vegetables.

Your fist size determines your own single serving.

Clear the confusion over serving size, don’t let it upset your apple cart and ruin your diet! By better understanding what a serving size may look like, consider these unique tips to trigger your memory the next time your prepare a meal, or go out to eat a restaurant. Ones body can tell an individual how they must eat to meet their own individual needs. Remember, in order to not over eat, drink (245 ml) 1 glass of water before your meal and another during the meal.

Serving Sizes: Use the list below to measure foods and serving sizes. A serving size means the size of food after it is cooked or prepared.

  • 1 teaspoon (tsp) is about the size of the tip of your little finger (from the last crease)
  • 1 tablespoon (Tbsp) is about the size of the tip of your thumb (from the last crease).
  • 2 tablespoons (Tbsp) is about the size of a large walnut.
  • One ounce of hard cheese is about a 1 inch cube.
  • 3 ounces of cooked meat, fish, or poultry is about the size of a deck of cards.
  • 1 ounce of cooked meat, fish, or poultry is about 1/4 cup (c).
  • 1/2 cup of fruit or vegetables is about half of a fist (A serving of cooked vegetables is 1/2 cup (1/2 handful) or 1 cup (1 handful) raw.)
  • 1 cup of food is the size of a fist, or 8 fluid ounces of liquid.
  • 1-1/2 cup (12 fluid ounces) of liquid is the size of 1 soda-pop can.
  • 1 pint or 2 cups (16 fluid ounces) of liquid is the size of 1-1/3 soda-pop cans.

The American Dietetic Association counsels that individuals maintain a healthy lifestyle by
including the following into their dietary intake:

  • 4 Serving Fruits
  • 5 Servings Vegetables
  • 2 Servings of Milk
  • 2 Servings of Protein
  • 2 Servings of Healthy Fat (2 Tbsp of Extra Virgin Olive or Canola Oil)
  • 6-11 Servings of Bread (Determined by body size; men eat more bread servings, while women eat less.)
Be smart and plan each meal! When choosing foods, aim for a daily total of 25-38 grams of fiber that will come from Vegetable, Fruit and Multi-Grains.
By: Kimberly Crocker- Scardicchio

References