Calculate Cholesterol, Choose TLC Diet to Menu Plan

Being informed and understanding what cholesterol is will provide stronger knowledge of individual “Specimen Information”, which should be requested from your Doctor after having blood drawn. Compare your numbers to the information listed below,  choose your foods wisely to improve your daily nutritional intake, and cleanse your body, optimizing it’s overall function in keeping you healthy.

Cholesterol is a fat,  lipid, or a sterol, from which hormones are made. It is a waxy substance that resembles the very fine scrapings of a whitish-yellow candle. Cholesterol flows through your body via your bloodstream, lipids are oil-based and blood is water-based, they don’t mix. If cholesterol were dumped into your bloodstream, it would congeal into unusable globs.

The fat in these particles are made up of cholesterol, triglycerides and a phospholipid, which helps make the whole particle stick together. Triglycerides are a particular type of fat that have three fatty acids attached to an alcohol called glycerol, composed of 90 percent of the fat in the food you eat. The body needs triglycerides for energy, but as with cholesterol, too much is bad for the arteries and the heart.

  • Total Cholesterol Reference Range: 125-200 mg/dl     
  • HDL Cholesterol Reference Range: 40-60 mg/dl 
  • TriglyceridesReference Range:  <150mg/dl                   
  • Direct LDL Cholesterol Reference Range: 100 – 129 mg/dl

                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Healthy Cholesterol Levels, (HDL) should be greater than 50-60 mg/dl.   HDL is a cholestrol that works within the arteries to reduce accumulation of plaque, that can lead to artherosclerosis, in turn, reducing your risk for heart disease. HDL is monitored to ensure there is enough of it to fight off the plaque build up within the arteries.

 “LDL cholesterol”, explained by Harvard University“in most people, (60-70 % of cholesterol) is carried in LDL particles, which act as ferries, taking cholesterol to the parts of the body that need it. Unfortunately, if you have too much LDL in the bloodstream, it deposits the cholesterol into the arteries, which can cause blockages and lead to heart attacks. The good news is that the amount of LDL in your blood-stream is related to the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol you eat. So, most people can decrease their LDL if they follow a reduced-fat diet.”

VLDL, stated by the “Clinical Reference Laboratory”, expressed as: “VLDL is a major carrier of triglyceride (60 -70% triglyceride 10-15% cholesterol). Circulating fatty acids are converted by the liver to form triglycerides.” Dr. Ginsberg of Columbia university simplifies the definition, “Very-Low Density Lipids are complexes of lipids and proteins assembled in the liver in response to nutrients and hormones. When VLDL are secreted, they carry almost all of the triglyceride in the blood-stream (they are about 85% triglycerides themselves), transporting triglycerides from the liver. When we are overweight, insulin resistant, or have diabetes, our livers secrete more VLDL with more triglycerides on every VLDL particle”.

People have varying degrees of success in lowering their cholesterol by changing their diets.  Meal Plan changes and Exercise both contribute to  lowering cholesterol and are highly recommended before pharmaceuticals are introduced. High cholesterol due to dietary intake of high saturated  foods (anything with animal fat) could be lowered by 5% to 20% with nutritional changes. The Therapeutic Lifestyle Change (TLC) Diet is recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. 

Calculating total cholesterol helps to put the pieces of the whole together.   The math equation for calculating total cholesterol is:

Total Cholesterol Formula  (TC) = LDL + HDL + (Triglycerides/5)

  • Sample lipid panel
  • Cholesterol, Total=195
  • HDL Cholesterol=55
  • Triglycerides = 100  (100/5=20)
  • Direct LDL Cholesterol=120

How Total Cholesterol is calculated using the sample numbers listed above.

  • example: (LDL) 120+ (HDL) 55 + 20= 195 (TC) Total Cholesterol

Calculating:  VLDL=Triglycerides/5

  • Triglycerides=100
  • example: 100/5=20 (VLDL)
  • Reference Range for VLDL is 5-40 mg/dl

Calculate Cholesterol Ratio

  • Total Cholesterol (mg/dl) / HDL Cholesterol (mg/dl)
  • Example: Total Cholesterol 200 mg/dl/ 50 mg/dl  HDL Cholesterol = 4.1  According to the American Heart Association is to keep your cholesterol ratio at 5 to 1 or lower.
  • Ideal ratio will be 3.5 to 1. Higher cholesterol ratio indicates a risk of heart disease, a lower ratio indicates a reduced risk of heart disease.

 

Various foods, beverages and spices are known for reducing, or interfering with bad cholesterol (LDL) and carrying it out of the body. Choose a variety of foods from the following lists including them at all your meals.

  •  Fruits and Vegetables (totaling 9 per day)
  • Teas
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Cinnamon1-4g (1/3 tsp – 1 1/2 tsp a day)
  • Ginger (250 mcg/day capsule form)
  •  Honey 3 1/2 tablespoons / day

Reduce the saturated fat in your diet 

  1. Eat fish 3-4 times a week and benefit from Omega 3!
  2. Limit the amount of meat and milk products.
  3. Choose low-fat products from various food groups.
  4. Replace butter, a saturated fat with: Extra Virgin Olive, Canola, or Peanut oils.  7% of your daily calories should come from saturated fat (200 mg)   with 25% to 35% of daily calories  from unsaturated fat. 
  5.  Your diet should include calories to maintain your desired weight and avoid gaining weight.

Fluids are equally important to a successful diet.  Add 1-2 glasses of water with 1/2 to 1 whole lemon each day. Drink 1-2 cups of Oolong tea each day. Oolong tea burns over 157% more fat than Green Tea and is a popular tea designed to accelerate weight loss. 

TLC Diet is recommended by Doctors as a path for reducing high cholesterol.  Calories/day  1100 – 1695

Lean meat, poultry, fish, dry legumes Choose 5 ounces (140 g)  per day  

  • Anchovies, Mackeral, Sardines, Salmon,
  • Substitute 1/4 cup tofu, or 1/2 cup dry beans or peas for 1 ounce of meat or fish.
  • 2 tablespoons (1 oz) nuts (Almonds, Walnuts, Hazelnuts, Peanuts Soynuts) or seeds
  • Eggs, 2 yolks per week, 1 whole egg. Egg whites or substitutes are okay to eat.
  • Lean Meat. 3 0z. 165 calories, 0 g carbohydrate, 21 g protein, 9 g fat

Low-fat milk products.  Choose 2 per day     

  • 2 to 3 per day
  • 1 cup nonfat or 1% milk
  • 1 cup nonfat or low-fat yogurt
  • 1 ounce fat-free or low-fat cheese
  • Each serving. 80-110 calories, 12 g carbohydrate, 8 g protein, 0-3 g fat

Fruits.  Choose 4-5 per day the selection is endless!    

  • Apple, Apricots, Berries, Banana, Grapes, Melons, Orange, Pear, Plums, Prunes
  • Each serving.  60 calories, 15 g carbohydrate, 0 g protein, 0 g fat

Various Vegetables!  Choose 5-7 per day          

  • Artichokes, Avocado, Peppers, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Mushrooms,Eggplants, Asparagus, Legumes, Broccoli.
  • 1/2 cup cooked (season with garlic parsley and oil), Grilled, or Raw vegetables
  • Each serving.  25 calories, 5 g carbohydrate, 2 g protein, 0 g fat
    1 cup raw thick green leafy greens

Whole grains for bread, cereals, pasta, rice .  Choose 4-6 servings per day.

  •  Whole Grains, Choose Aunt Millies breads.
  • 1 slice whole grain bread
  • 1/2 wheat or multi-grain bagel, or English muffin
  • 1 ounce cold cereal (Bran)
  • Oatmeal for breakfast. (Quaker Oatmeal steel cut. Avoid 1 minute oatmeal)
  • 1/2 cup cooked whole grain pasta, rice, noodles, or other grains
  • Each serving. 80 calories, 15 g carbohydrate, 3 g protein, 1-3 g fat

Fat and oils.  Choose 2-3 servings per day

  • Each serving.  45 calories, 0 g carbohydrate, 0 g protein, 5 g fat.
    No Trans Fat (hydrogenated oils)
    1 teaspoon monounsaturated oil, such as Canola, Corn, EVOO, or Peanut
    1 tablespoon salad dressing (vinagrette)
    1 tbsp MCT Oil

By:  K. Crocker

Literature Research

  1.  Diet Low Sodium Meal Plan
  2. VLDL http://www.crlcorp.com/testDetails.cfm?facilityID=TLS&testID=510
  3. VLDL Dr. Ginsberg  http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/569664av
  4. LDL Harvard University  http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Understanding_Cholesterol.htm
  5. Ginger reduces LDL Cholesterol  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=ginger%20reduces%20ldl
  6. Cinnamon reduces LDL Cholesterol http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14633804
  7. Honey Reduces Cholesterol http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454257
  8. Calculate Cholesterol Ratio  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cholesterol-ratio/AN01761

Zucchini and Carrot Side Dish

A perfect pairing of two vegetables! Zucchini is high in Vitamin B6,2,1 Vitamin C, A and minerals. While carrots carry the load in carotenoids with recent research also linking critical phytonutrients Falcarinol and Falcarindiol to inhibiting the growth of intestinal and colon cancer cells, making it a power house vegetable! Enjoy this wonderful side dish weekly or daily and see how you can improve your health.

Zucchini and Carrots maybe prepared together or separately. Maybe served over: Rice, Quinoa, Couscous, or Pasta.

Sliced Carrots and Zucchini for saute`

An easy side dish to prepare that takes little time to prepare and full of nutrients. Establish healthier individual standards and enjoy this dish served warm or cold. The recipe can be used for a”Zucchini” or “Carrot” only dish.

Ingredients

  • 2 Garlic Cloves minced
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 Carrots, thinly sliced rounds
  • Chopped Garlic and Parsley

  • 3 Zucchini, thinly sliced rounds
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp Fresh Parsley chopped

Saute vegetables in pan

Directions:

Place skillet on low-heat, add olive oil and garlic, allow to heat for 4 minutes. Add in sliced carrots and saute` for 4 minutes. Place Zucchini into skillet and add salt. Using a wooden spoon integrate vegetables together, simmering for about 5 minutes.  Add parsley into carrots and zucchini.

By: Kim Crocker-Scardicchio

Research:

Calorie Reduction, Keeping it Tastey

Yes, recipes can be altered in order to reduce calories without sacrificing taste.

Incorporate these cooking tricks  to enhance meals and desserts.  Use equal amounts of oil for melted shortening, margarine or butter. HEALTHY OILS: Olive Oil, Canola Oil

Shortening, butter, or oil in baking
Use applesauce, prune puree or low fat yogurt to replace butter, shortening or oil in the exact amount. May need to reduce baking time by 25% to avoid a dry cake.

Butter is still the best when it comes to making pie crusts. Reduce the serving size that you put on your plate and top off with fresh cut fruit!

Whole milk, half and half or evaporated milk
Replace with skim milk, 1% milk, evaporated skim milk, fat-free half and half , or plain soymilk with calcium.

Butter, shortening, margarine, or oil to prevent sticking. Fat to sauté or stir-fry.
When sauteing foods, use cooking spray, water, broth or nonstick pans. Use ¼ c. Canola Oil at medium temp to fry foods.

Full-fat cream cheese
Substitute with low-fat or nonfat cream cheese, Neufchatel or low-fat cottage cheese puree until smooth. Use low-fat yogurt to replace higher fat dairies in recipes. In some cases fruit flavored low-fat yogurt is also a good substitute.

Full-fat sour cream
Full-fat cottage cheese
Full-fat Ricotta cheese
Use nonfat or reduced fat sour cream or fat-free plain yogurt. (Yogurt is not heat stable.) Use 2% or fat-free cottage cheese. Use part-skim ricotta.

Cream
Whipping cream
Try utilizing evaporated skim milk
Use non fat whipped topping or cream (This is only non fat if one serving size is used.)

Eggs
Use egg whites (usually 2 egg whites for every egg) or ¼ cup egg substitute.
Whole fat cheese
Use reduced fat cheese, but add it at the end of the baking time or use part skim mozzarella.

Frying in fat
Try other effective cooking methods such as: bake, boil, broil, grill, poach, roast, stir-fry, or microwave.

Regular mayonnaise or salad dressing
Low fat, reduced or non fat mayonnaise or salad dressing. Top off salads: Whisk lemon juice, oil, oregano and pepper together.

Canned fish
Buy water-packed canned products.

Fat cuts of meat w skin on
Leaner cuts of meat or ground meat, remove skin before cooking.

By: Kimberly Crocker

Carbohydrates or Saccharides

Carb o hydrate =  Carbon and hydration for the body.

Carbohydrates are also known as saccharides, or simple sugars, they are: lactose, fructose, cellulose, lactose and glucose.  These sugars are not the white table sugar (sucrose) that most of us are familiar with, but instead come from plants or milk, which provide us with daily energy.

Fruits and vegetables provide our bodies with: nutrients, water and energy.  Their sugar group is fructose and cellulose.

Whole grains are critical for B Vitamins, which are linked to: focus, mood stability and strength. When flour is reduced from its natural brown color, the flour loses its nutritional value. The whole grains and cereal come from the group of sugars called cellulose.

Milk also provides us with the nutrients, fluid and energy and comes from the sugar based group of lactose.

Our glucose levels in our blood reflect our nutrient and energy uptake.  Eating the proper quantity of “sugars” reflect how our body is utilizing the foods that we eat and how much daily exercise we are getting.  A favorable glucose level is between 65 and 100.

Although some of these molecules are larger in size they are primarily derived from a simple molecule whose basic form is made up of two carbon’s, a hydrogen and an oxygen.

5 Tips to Ensure Holiday Weight Maintenance.

Holiday’s are for enjoying food, family and fun! January 2 is the moment of truth when one decisively chooses to go on a “diet”. While new diets that apply calorie shifting are given multiple glances and serioulsy put into consideration, it’s important to remember that the word “diet” is about lifestyle and how one eats on a daily basis.

Five tips are easy to follow in order to shift caloric intake and to make sure that access weight gain is headed off at the pass.

Tip 1.      Begin the day with a breakfast.
Protein such as an egg,
Slice of wheat bread
Fruit
Glass of milk
This is an old trick that helps to fill up the stomach so that less food is consumed throughout the morning. You may even feel the need to have a lighter lunch as well.

Tip 2.      Consume calcium for your snacks. Your body needs to be supplied with calcium for both muscles and bones. Weightgain has been linked to low intake of calcium intake. Example: Three glasses of milk can replace any choice of fluid. Many do not realize how many other foods have calcium. Flaxseed actually contains the highest amount at 40% of dietary intake. Almonds and milk contain the same amount of calcium for dietary intake at 25%. 3 ounces of Almonds = 8 ounces of milk (1 glass). Broccoli and oranges also can be added to the daily dietary count of calcium.

Tip 3.      Eat! Dietetics is about how “All Foods Fit”. Don’t resist the temptation. Eyeball the cake size that you want and then cut in 1/2 the amount that you would have otherwise have chosen. (If really courageous cut portion by 3/4’s. This way you can have your cake and you get to eat it too.

Tip 4.      Wine is not a fruit! Just because it comes from a grape doesn’t mean that it gets to be counted on your daily intake of 4 fruits per day. There are 100 calories in a half of glass of wine, which is considered one serving! Women and Men are instructed to consume no more than one to two alcholic beverages per day. 1 serving for a women and 2 servings for men.

Tip 5.      Salty foods are commonly placed in serving bowls throughout gathering areas. Be careful to choose only half of what you really would like to consume. Fruits and vegetables, especially those high in potassium, will flush out the excess salt from your body that will otherwise contribute to weightgain. (banana’s, oranges, kiwi)

Follow all these tips or just a few and you should notice only your weight maintenance. Happy Holidays from Eat Know How!

Define Carb Counting for Easy Weightloss

Counting carbs.   1 Carb count= 15 grams of Carbohydrate!  It is an easy way to do Nutritional Math at any given time.  FOR A COMPLETE LIST follow this link: http://dtc.ucsf.edu/pdfs/FoodLists.pdf

We can learn about counting carbs and balancing our dietary intake from those who suffer from diabetes.  Carb Counting is a meal planning method commonly used for people with diabetes, but can also be used in meal plansto achieve weightloss. Balancing the carbs you eat with your insulin doses can help you to achieve better blood glucose control.

Where Are the Carbs???
Carbs are found in the following foods and are part of the Carb Food Exchange when counting your daily running tab, reviewed under Nutritional Math.
Fruit, fruit juices (or any food that contains fruit or fruit juices)
Milk, ice cream, yogurt (or any food that contains milk)
Breads, cereals, crackers, grains, pasta, rice
Starchy vegetables (such as corn, potatoes, peas or beans)
Sweets (such as cake, candy, cookies, pie)
Sugary foods (such as regular soda, fruit drinks, sherbet)
Beer, wine and mixed drinks

All carbs are created equal!

It is the amount of carb you eat during a meal or snack that is important, not the type of carbFor example:  One cup of vanilla yogurt that has 30 grams of carbs and a sandwich with 30 grams of carbs,  

 both effect blood glucose levels in the same way.

Counting Carbs can be performed one of two ways:

  1. Carb servings 
  2. Carb grams.

One carb serving = roughly 15 grams of carb. 

A gram (g) is a unit of measure used for foods.                                                              Either method can be used and you will also need to recognize portion sizes.  For quick and easy daily help check the glycemic index for an exact number per food serving.

Check you food label under “Total Carbohydrate” to confirm the # of grams in a serving of food.  The general rule of thumb is 1 carb=15 grams (more or less).

1 serving or 1 apple is = 19 carbs

1 serving or 1 orange = 15 carbs

1 serving or 1 cup peas = 11 carbs

1 serving or 1 slice multi-grain bread = 13 carbs

1 serving or 6 oz lean meat, fish = 0 carbs

The foods in the groups listed below contain about 15 grams of carb per serving or choice. Each listed choices will affect your blood glucose level the same.

The following servings are one carb choice = 15 grams of carb

  • 1/2-cup orange juice from the Fruit group
    3/4 cup of cereal from the Bread/Starch group
    1 cup homemade coleslaw from the Vegetable group.

Using Grams, instead of counting servings, allows you to add up the grams of carb in a meal or snack. Grams are located on food labels. Your meal plan may suggest specific amounts of carb grams at each meal or snack.

NUTRITIONAL MATH

In a  2000 calorie diet, 1000 calories should come from carbohydrates. 

There are 4 calories per 1 gram of carbohydrate.

1000 cal/4 cal =250 g carb daily allotment.

250 g/ 15 g = 17 carbs

 Count 17 Carbs each dayin your diet to equal the 1000 calories of carbs.

Now, the other 1000 calories will need to come from Protein and Fat.

35% Fat or 1000 x .35=350 Fat calories

65% Protein or 1000 x .65 or 650 Protein calories

1000 Calories Carbohydrates

350 Calories Fat

   +650 Calories Protein                                                                                                 Total     2000 Calories Daily Intake

FYI  Generally speaking, the size of a sugar molecule that is in fruit, vegetables (fructose) and milk (galactose) is smaller and easier for your body to break down.  Sugar (sucrose), corn syrup and also white bread have a  complexed sugar molecule that is harder for your body to breakdown.  For example a chocolate bar is 30grams or 2 carb count.  Choose Milk, Fruit, Vegetable, Multigrain bread which have a lower 1 carb food exchange as opposed to the chips and candy bars which will have 3 carb food exchange.  It’s about optimizing your nutrient intake.  17 carbs go fast!  This is especially critical for those with Diabetes who will have an over production of insulin to do the job.

For more info

http://www.aspiruslibrary.org/patient_ed/pdf/dec/pe-dec-019.pdf

http://lowcarbmeal.info/

By: Kimberly Crocker